Current Projects and Project Partners

Join us in exploring the past 10,000 years of Page Hall and Grimesthorpe and the people from all over the world who have contributed to its vibrant past!

Page Hall Smiles, which is run by Rosamaria Cisneros, brought together Roma and non-Roma to co-create a number of short films and collate images and a digital scrapbook exhibition that focused on the experiences, identity and voices of the people from Page Hall told by the residents themselves. 

An online Celebration of community through arts, culture and creativity, run by Migration Matters

Roots and Futures is a collaborative investigation of heritage and place linking staff in the Department of Archaeology with Kelham Island Museum and Sheffield-based community groups Zest and KINCA. The project’s aim is to use co-production methods to create new understandings of  Sheffield’s built and buried heritage. Focusing on the industrial areas of Kelham Island, Neepsend, Upperthorpe and Netherthorpe, the project engages members of local communities in a collaborative exploration of shared heritage, focusing on generating new knowledge and reflecting on what aspects of the archaeology and history of these areas are important and meaningful to communities today.

Roots and Futures App

Past Projects

Page-Hall-Smiles-1-2
phf_postermain
roots and futures-02.png
love heritage sheffield

Grimesthorpe Story Swap, Sheffield City Council

The Grimesthorpe Story Swap, which began in January 2019, aimed to increase community cohesion within Grimesthorpe, and raise the profile of the Grimesthorpe Family Centre.

The project focused on the community that lives within Grimesthorpe and aimed to work alongside the community to produce an audio art piece showcasing the connections within Grimesthorpe’s diverse community. Using this concept as the heart of the project, a series of events were carried out to support and celebrate the community within Grimesthorpe.

Working in Partnership with Ignite Imaginations, Greentop Circus and local dance groups we created a range of activities and events,  which were aimed at all ages. These included family fun days, arts and crafts days and oral history and story sharing sessions.  At the end of the project we held an unveiling event of the community art piece ' Little Grimesthorpe' .

_MG_7407

_MG_7407

_MG_7450

_MG_7450

_MG_7344

_MG_7344

_MG_7323

_MG_7323

_MG_7309

_MG_7309

_MG_7315

_MG_7315

_MG_7307

_MG_7307

_MG_7304

_MG_7304

_MG_7301

_MG_7301

_MG_7300

_MG_7300

_MG_7303

_MG_7303

_MG_7296

_MG_7296

_MG_7291

_MG_7291

_MG_7282

_MG_7282

The Celebrating Our Woodland Heritage project is funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund and led by Pennine Prospects. Pennine Prospects hired me to write up some of their community field surveys, undertake photogrammetric surveys on their excavations along a Roman road and also carry out community photogrammetric workshops with their community group.

Tinsley Time and Travel, Heeley City Farm

This community project explored the heritage that has shaped Tinsley since pre-history, those of transport, travel and change; the project engaged residents and the wider community in a broader understanding of Tinsley’s heritage of transition and resilience.

 

Tinsley’s story is one of resilience and adaptability to change, not only physical and economic change, but also changing populations.  People from different places have been coming to Tinsley, building and changing its identity, since prehistory, both making routes in and out and establishing roots within the community itself.

 

The project is based around 9 key heritage milestones in Tinsley's past, all located within the project area. They are all of great local significance, each having a much wider impact on the development of the community. Each milestone covers a time of change in Tinsley and they all link to travel. Together they tell the story of Tinsley's changing identity. The project milestones cover different types of heritage including, archaeological objects, historic landscape, archives, historical sites, natural heritage and memories from the bronze age to modern times.

I began Archaeology in the City in 2014 when I was studying my PhD at the University of Sheffield. As their outreach officer it was clear that a unified student led outreach programme would be beneficial for both the students, local community and department as a way to create more engagement between the University of Sheffield’s Department of Archaeology and the general public. Since then it has passed through several iterations of passionate archaeology PhD students, with the goal of using the knowledge and resources afforded to us through our work at the department to share archaeology with member’s of Sheffield public.

music-3

music-3

mg_7424

mg_7424

mg_7522

mg_7522

mg_7423

mg_7423

mg_7378

mg_7378

talk-3d-heritage

talk-3d-heritage

20150526_100924

20150526_100924

13308519_10101524105273222_3274169420030

13308519_10101524105273222_3274169420030

18815350_1954422348147958_76963686722154

18815350_1954422348147958_76963686722154

2016-05-31_22-18-36

2016-05-31_22-18-36

yat
international day of happiness
17817870_1004681096299658_8121006927296593920_n(1)
Broomhill infants with teacher and PhD students at the dig (1)_edited_edited
18252878_1936945923219372_3196714149476302848_n
collective poster
18815350_1954422348147958_7696368672215488720_o (1)_edited
9
7
Collage your Community (1)
6
5
4
11147071_1623740957882767_7649906699096471736_n (1)
13909108_1799825780274283_6437901468383316659_o
18882224_1954168301506696_8231077051377781956_n_edited
13315621_1762498397340355_601099785595859008_n
11401212_1624124367844426_2648939246706163700_n (1)
TurningthePage